Wonder Woman: A Hero Beyond The Screen

LB’S NOTE: Yes, it’s true that Monday is usually my poetry day. However, all kinds of things, including a mysterious visitor from my past, omens of good fortune and fair trade, and an overcrowded schedule mean that the next epic from yours truly can’t be here today but absolutely will be online June 19th, in honor of Father’s Day.

As we used to say on Hawaii Five-0 (the real one)“Be there!”

Meanwhile, Kate Graham graces us with her insight once again:


by Kathryn Graham

We write about TV here at TVWriter, but for this past weekend, all of the attention has been on the silver screen. There’s one reason for that.

Wonder Woman.

Since this is the kind of film I’ve waited my whole life for, I am going to write about it, TV emphasis be damned. I cannot be confined!

My review of Wonder Woman is:

I need to watch it again.

I went into it expecting to be absolutely blown away, and truth be told, I wasn’t. I enjoyed it, but it wasn’t the spectacle all of the hype had me believing it was.

That’s exactly why I need to see it again. I need to be able to take it for what it is – a beautiful, powerful superhero movie with a sprinkling of deeper meaning and a lot of women kicking ass.

Because that part, oh that part was glorious.

See, I don’t like superhero movies in general. The main reason is I know that I’m going to see something that’s meant for men, which apparently means three things: women are scarce, women are love interests, women wear skin tight clothing.

I hear a lot about how important it is that little girls can look up to Wonder Woman. No doubt. But I’d posit to say: adult women need her just as much if not more. I need her more.

Wonder Woman wants women to feel the same thrill and excitement that every man has felt his entire life when he watched Spiderman, Superman, or Batman take the bad guys down. It isn’t that we can’t identify with Superman, of course not, but you tell me it doesn’t say something when only one gender is kicking the hell out of evil and the other is the ‘love interest’.

You tell me how it feels when your main purpose is to be hot. When no matter how badass you are, you always need someone to save you.

Not so with Wonder Woman.

Women were in tears while watching her fight because this was a realization of a long-awaited dream.

The importance of this film stretches far beyond a simple superhero movie, not just for the audience, but for the industry.

Wonder Woman and Patty Jenkins are superheroes for all women in the film industry. Hollywood is so sexist, they don’t even bother to hide it. Anything a woman touches is judged ten times harsher because she is somehow representative of her entire gender. Every failure is a setback for half of the damn population instead of a shitty movie.

One bad superhero movie and suddenly no one wants to see female superheroes. One bad female directed movie, and well, we know women couldn’t direct, didn’t we boys?

Wonder Woman saved us.

It never should have come to this. If we lived in an equitable and free meritocracy, we would have thousands of movies directed, written, starred in, crewed, and more by women. All of them judged by how stupid the plot was, how great the acting, the big booms and zooms, and not by the gender of the person who worked on it.

We don’t live in that world. Even with Wonder Woman, the number of women working in film is abysmal, and I’m skeptical about just how much better it will get now. But this movie has given us a ray of hope.

Sure, I would have loved to have seen a bulkier woman play Wonder Woman, but Gal Gadot did a great job. Yes, I would have loved for there to be more women in the movie later on, but I understand why they weren’t. Yes, I want to see Wonder Woman have a female love interest someday, and yes, I’ll be happy to write that script for you, thank you for asking!

Anyway…

This movie was a small step forward that feels like a giant leap.

Wonder Woman may not be the hero we deserve (do we deserve better or worse? you decide), but she is a hero we can believe in. Thank you, everyone who worked on this movie. Truly. I’m off go to see it in IMAX.


Kathryn Graham is a TVWriter™ Contributing Editor and our very own wonder woman although she probably doesn’t believe that. Learn more about Kate HERE

About Kathryn Graham

Los Angeles-based television writer, TVWriter Contributing Editor, and lover of women. e-mail: kathrynagraham@gmail.com