How to Get Hired as a Video Professional

TVWriter™ visitors have demonstrated time and time again that they you love how-to articles almost as much as those about getting a proper gig. So we’re happy to present this post which – oh, how fortuitous – just happens to cover both beloved arenas:

Video-Pro-Cover-865x505by Rebecca Case

Sometimes, we find ourselves searching for work in a certain niche that we think we belong in, but it’s important you don’t let preconceived notions limit your access to quality opportunities. For example, many of us come out of school certain that we will become professional, classically-defined filmmakers but, frankly, those jobs are limited.

If you haven’t already, consider other kinds of production, like commercials, reality television, or even corporate marketing and training videos. There are many opportunities to be creative and produce beautiful work in areas you may not be thinking about (often with the added bonus of a more preferable work/life balance).

Networking

Regardless of your field, the single best way to get work is through people you know. This has proven true for me and those I know time and again. Start early and don’t ever stop!

In fact, I wish I would have been more intentional about networking earlier in my life. Even if you are still in school, use that opportunity to create connections! You are surrounded by a built-in network of people who are preparing themselves to go out into the work force. They may not be a professional resource in the near term, but foster relationships with people who are smart and who are driven, or who you find common ground with, because, down the line, those relationships will be very valuable when you are looking for employment.

Networking in school is a less formal version of the practice, but the value is that you can foster the relationship on a personal level without any of the baggage of the quid pro quo nature of most professional interactions. Relying on family members can be a mixed bag, but often reaching out to relatives can be beneficial, too (they should have a vested interest in your success, after all!).

If you are post-graduation, don’t give up on tapping into that network. Get involved in alumni organizations or reach out to the career center at your school and ask them for ideas for organizations or clubs to join. Connect with old friends online and, if they are working in your field, reach out to them.

The goal can’t always be to find a job directly from those in your network. A great way to utilize those you’re connected to is to ask them for “warm introductions” to people that may be in their network. Look at their profiles to see who they are connected to and if you find anyone who you may be interested in meeting, ask them to write a simple email of introduction. The recipient will be far more likely to talk to you or help you out if they know you have a mutual connection….

Read it all at Premium Beat