For All The Rebels

It isn’t about violating the law, it’s about, um, erm…principle?

How to Pirate Movies, Music, TV Shows, and Books Without Getting Caught
by Kyle Wagner

Last time we did this, we were talking about software. This time, let’s talk media. That is movies, music, TV shows, and everything else the copyright lawyers scream about.

Before that, though, let’s talk about the ground rules here. You should not pirate things you don’t own. But ownership is a murky subject in content these days. Let’s say you bought a DVD in 2002, and now your new laptop doesn’t have a DVD player. You’re screwed—unless you want to buy the same movie, in a different format. Or you can pirate it.
Technically, you’re breaking the law. No way around that. But moralistically? It’s harder to say. But this guide isn’t here to debate morals. That’s on you. This is just a toolbox for how to pirate stuff without getting caught.

Low-Tech Hacks

This is really about the path of least resistance. And often, that is just using what’s available to you. Let’s go to the Game of Thrones argument. HBO won’t shut up and take your money for HBO Go a la carte. Right. Well, if your dad subscribes, or your Great Aunt Betty who loves her talkies but doesn’t work the computer so good, then you can take advantage of their subscription on HBO Go.

All you’ve got to do is log in with a subscriber’s cable service online information. So: call your dad and ask for his password. Problem solved. Same goes for Amazon Prime. If you don’t have the service, an account is permitted to cover multiple family members.

For books, there is the little-used Public Library ebook lending option. And also, Project Gutenberg has an expansive collection of free public domain works. Many of the more obscure works aren’t in the marketplaces, while some more popular books cost a nominal fee of $0.99 elsewhere.

Now on to the real stuff.

Read it all

Yeah. Principle. That’s our story and we’re sticking to it.

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