The myth of the creative person

Not, not young Ernest Hemingway. It's Lord Byron, who created the myth Hemingway tried to recreate.

Not, not young Ernest Hemingway. It’s Lord Byron, who created the myth Hemingway tried to recreate.

by Nathan Bransford

One of the reasons I came to writing relatively late in life is because I never thought of myself as a creative person, an idea I explore in myguide to writing a novel.

Whenever artists and writers are portrayed in movies and on TV, they’re always moody and flighty and bold and wacky and adventurous. Unbound by societal norms and twitchy with creativity that might spring forth at any moment.

I don’t know many writers that fit this stereotype. To be sure, I know plenty of wacky writers, many of us can be social misfits at times and, and on the whole, sure, maybe writing types are a little more moody and flighty and in our own heads than the general population.

But you don’t have to be this type of a person to write a novel.

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