Bob Tinsley: Adventures in Audio Drama – 2

Chapter 2
by Bob Tinsley

Seeing_Ear_Theater

“Audio drama is just radio drama, old, poorly recorded and badly acted.”

This is just a matter of perception. Modern audio drama can be as slick and professional as a television show.

Check out “Seeing Ear Theater”. From 1997 to 2001 they put out some amazing audio dramas written by people like Neil Gaiman, J. Michael Straczynski (creator of Babylon 5), Harlan Ellison and others. The actors were big names as well. You can find all their shows here (http://tinyurl.com/lfkepzn) for free download. Check out “Black Canoes”, or, if you are a Gaiman fan, the two-part “Snow Glass Apples”. That one is guaranteed to make you look at Snow White from a different perspective.

Another wonderful place is ZBS.org. One of their new series is the “Dixon and Sparks Mysteries”. The first episode is free here (http://tinyurl.com/kdaqlew). One of their other series, “Ruby: Galactic Gumshoe”, has been running since the late 1960s. Many of their shows have been recorded in 3D binaural sound. Listening with headphones really immerses you in the story. People walk behind you!

Then there is the Wireless Theatre Company in Britain (www.wirelesstheatrecompany.co.uk), Radio Drama Revival (www.radiodramarevival.com), Darker Projects (www.darkerproject.com) and many others. You can actually find shows produced from my own original scripts, for instance, “Heroes” (http://tinyurl.com/l3nxd66). I published the script for that show on Amazon and Nook. Just search for Robert W. Tinsley, if you’re interested.

All these stories, these audio dramas, transport the listener to a different place. The world created in the listener’s mind is boundless, unconscribed by the limits of budget, space or technology. It is a world of limitless possibility.

Don’t books or TV or movies do that just as well or better? No, in those formats you are constrained within the author’s/director’s world. He describes the characters leaving you with his vision of them. He describes a beach or a forest the way he sees them.

Norman Corwin, a famous radio writer/producer said: “Features and dimensions of a place, of a room, of a landscape, are not, in a good radio script, described in so many words. They are perceived by characters and brought out by speech, sound, by allusion. Obliquely.”

In audio you “see” the character based on his voice, his manner of speaking. He becomes “your” character. You hear the sound of waves, the cry of sea birds; you are on “your” beach. The whole experience is more intimate.

Why is this; why this intimacy? Sound; sound is more imagination-centric than sight. Sound stimulates the imagination. How often has a song taken you back to a particular time in your life? Elicited an emotion? That’s called “anamnesis”, an often involuntary recall of memory caused by the evocative power of sound.

Audio drama is a complex experience requiring more listener participation than video.

As far as wide acceptance of audio drama goes, the question then becomes, “Does audio drama require too much participation for the Average Joe to deal with?”

I’ll look into that next.