You’ve Got to Stay Hungry to Survive (as a Writer)

Time now for the most depressing news since the last most depressing news. An informal poll of TVWriter™ minions – and our Most Beneficent Boss, Larry Brody – confirms that the following article about entrepreneurs also applies to writers (and probably everybody else in showbiz, for that matter). Not for the faint of heart:

stayinghungry

Be Hungry or Starve as an Entrepreneur
by Grand Cardone

When you win the Super Bowl, in life or in business, you cannot ever win again if you do not immediately go back to training — you must stay hungry, win or lose, success or failure. Whether the Panthers or the Broncos win the Super Bowl this year if they stop training they will never win another Super Bowl. Success requires constant attention and the moment you stop hunting for it, it will escape you. You must approach the creation of success as a must-have obligation, do-or-die mission, gotta-have-it, hungry-dog-on-the-back-of-a-meat-truck mentality.

Let your customers know you are hungry. Don’t act like you don’t need their business. There is an old saying that tells people to “fake it ’til you make it.” Well, this doesn’t apply here! Instead, you want to “act hungry to make sure you don’t end up hungry.”

I challenge you today to do two things:

1. You must change your mindset.

No one likes people who act like they are better than others and never act so important you don’t need people’s business. If you didn’t need their business you wouldn’t be in business. Everyone appreciates someone who goes the extra mile and really shows others that he or she wants, needs, and values others’ business. You will never create a powerful, solvent, prosperous, and abundant economy with an attitude of arrogance.

In almost every seminar I conduct, someone will say to me, “I’m afraid I might seem weak if I act like I want the business too much.” My response is always the same: “The biggest mistake you can make is not to act like you’re hungry for the business!” Let’s face it: You need clients more than they need you in any economy. An attitude of, “they need me more than I need them” always fails; treat your customers as though they’re more valuable than you and your company—because they are….

Read it all at Entrepreneur

Don’t Forget to Learn from your Failures

It’s positive spin time here at TVWriter™, gals and guys, so here are a few words that should help us all find upbeat showbiz futures in even the darkest of clouds. What better way to make ourselves feel better than this helpful – albeit slightly generic – investigation into the human condition?

despairby Art Markman

We all fail, all the time. We might miss a call with a client because of an emergency work meeting, or miss that meeting because another project has suddenly become urgent. And then we (or our families) get sick, and we have to shift priorities around again.

These unsystematic failures are benign, though. They reflect that all of us have limited resources. There simply is not enough time, energy, or money, to do everything you want to do all the time. Part of being a responsible adult is learning to make tradeoffs: balancing your conflicting goals and trying to get as much done as you can in the time you have.

Unsystematic failures can also help you calibrate the right approach to the specific tradeoff between effort and accuracy. If you fail occasionally, you’re probably hitting the right balance. If you fail too often, you’re probably not putting in enough effort. If you never fail, then chances are you are spending too much time on most of your projects, because in general, the longer you work on a project, the better it gets. By polishing a particular project to a high gloss, you’re giving yourself less time for other things that require your attention. The trick is to figure out how much effort is enough for each project, so that over time, you manage to take care of most of the things you need to do and do them well enough.

The thing you really need to watch out for is systematic failure.

Systematic failure happens when there’s a particular goal you want to achieve, but never get to.

Maybe it’s a major achievement, like writing a book or applying for a fellowship. It could be an important daily goal, like exercising or eating healthier.

No matter what it is, the causes of systematic failures usually boil down to some combination of these three factors:

Read it all at HBR

The Week at TVWriter™ – Week Ending January 17, 2016

Thumbs-Up

In case you’ve missed what’s been happening here at TVWriter™, the most popular blog posts by TVWriter™ visitors last week were:

Peggy Bechko Muses About Writing With A Partner

Kelly Jo Brick: The Write Path with Manager Markus Goerg, Part 1

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

Larry Brody on Scene Construction

Ten Tips for Kickstarting Your Writing

And our most visited permanent resource pages were:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

THE SPEC SCRIPTACULAR

The Outline/Story

The Logline

The Teleplay

And, destined to become one of our most popular articles of the year, is the most exciting announcement we’ve had to make since, well, the last most exciting announcement we’ve made: The 2015 SPEC SCRIPTACULAR Semi-Finalists!

Who sez TVWriter™ doesn’t treat ya right?

Major thanks to everyone for making this such a great week. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed. re-read what you loved, and, most importantly, come back for more soon!

The Week at TVWriter™ – Week Ending January 10, 2016

Thumbs-Up

In case you’ve missed what’s been happening here at TVWriter™, the most popular blog posts by TVWriter™ visitors last week were:

Peggy Bechko Muses About Writing With A Partner

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

Always Good to Know That Our Contributing Editors are Working

Ten Tips for Kickstarting Your Writing

Larry Brody on Scene Construction

And our most visited permanent resource pages were:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Outline/Story

The Logline

THE SPEC SCRIPTACULAR

The Teleplay

Coming in the next 10 days, the announcement we’ve all been waiting for: The 2015 SPEC SCRIPTACULAR Semi-Finalists!

Major thanks to everyone for making this such a great week. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed. re-read what you loved, and, most importantly, come back for more soon!

Angela Santomero on How to Create a Hit Kids’ Show

Angela Santomero is the creator of Nick Jr’s BLUE’S CLUES, PBS’s DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD and SUPERWHY, Amazon’s CREATIVE GALAXY, and others. In other words: She knows what she’s talking about. So listen up!

YouTube Preview Image

More about and by Angela Santomero

The Week at TVWriter™ Dec. 28 – Jan 3

Thumbs-Up

In case you’ve missed what’s been happening here at TVWriter™, the most clicked-on blog posts by TVWriter™ visitors last week were:

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

Larry Brody on Scene Construction

What It takes to Make a Hit TV Show

Kelly Jo Brick: The Write Path With LaToya Morgan, Part 2

Top TVWriter™ Posts of the Year 2015

And our most visited permanent resource pages were:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Outline/Story

The Logline

The Teleplay

THE BASICS OF TV WRITING: Overview

Major thanks to everyone for making this such a great week. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed. re-read what you loved, and, most importantly, come back for more soon!