Writing Memes to Make You Laugh and Cry

They’re everywhere, right? All those encouraging words about what it is to be a writer? TVWriter™ frequent visitor Gloria E recently found three that struck her, and us, as presenting the entire range of the writing game –  hope and pragmatism and (to this TVWriter™ minion) a very disappointing type of despair:

 

 

 

 

Oh, almost forgot. For this minion, the first meme is what I want to believe, the second is the crafty lesson I know I need, and the third…well, it expresses my greatest fear – that I’ll make it as a writer and discover that I’m still stuck in the most mundane of ordinary lives.

In other words, “Yikes!”

 

@TVWriterCom Don’t-Miss Posts of the Week – April 10, 2017

Time for TVWriter™’s  Monday look at our 5 most popular blog posts of the week ending yesterday. They are, in order:

‘Trial And Error’ is Trying My Patience

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

John Ostrander on ‘Twin Peaks’: Fool Me Once

LB: 3 Shows I Just Can’t Watch Anymore

Larry Brody’s Poetry: ‘Kid Hollywood Had A Mighty Fine Deal’

And our 5 most visited permanent resource pages are, also in order:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Logline

The Outline/Story

The Leavebehind

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT

Major thanks to everyone for making this another great week at TVWriter™. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed and re-read what you loved!

It’s Writers Guild of America Solidarity Day!

Okay, so we just made that up for the heading. But here’s what the WGA West posted on Facebook today, asking writers to use it as their new profile pic:

@TVWriterCom #Solidarity

Yeppers, we’re into this. And we believe everyone else interested in writing for TV and films should be too.

Diana Vacc sees ‘Beauty and the Beast’

by Diana Vaccarelli

—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT–

Friday March 17, 2017, Disney Studios released the live action version of their iconic animated film Beauty and the Beast. Growing up, I loved the animated film and watched it countless times, so I was truly excited to see how Disney would reinterpret the classic fairy tale of a prince who is imprisoned in the form of a beast and can only be freed by true love.

And guess what? I was not disappointed.

THE GOOD:

The actors inhabit their roles perfectly. Emma Watson was born to play the beautiful Belle and brings truth and power to the role. Dan Stevens as the Beast gives us the heart we need to empathize with him and his situation. Watson and Stevens have great chemistry, making us root for Belle and the Beast to get to know each other better so their love can develop and grow strong.

Ewan McGregor, Ian McKellen, and Emma Thompson as Lumiere, Cogsworth, and Mrs. Potts bring their motion capture characters to life. The CGI feels absolutely real, and I admit that I teared up toward the end as we were presented with a terrible fate for these characters.

Luke Evans as our villain, Gaston, brings the all the narcissism of this classic character to life with humor to spare. One scene in particular sums it up as we watch Gaston profess his love for Belle…while admiring himself in a mirror.

The makeup on the Beast was fantastic. Every bit as striking as in the animated film.

The music by Alan Menken, who also did the original’s score, returns with great additions. Yes, those  additions are often corny but are fun nevertheless, and overall the music does a fine job of helping the story move forward while bringing out the emotion in each scene.

The writing by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos not only lives up to the original, it add info that the animated version missed. Many critics have complained that it is mostly “unnecessary” backstory, but I loved seeing the party and the Enchantress changing the prince into the Beast. And as somebody who always wondered why Belle and her father were living in that little backwater village, I especially loved this version’s answer as well as discovering so much more about Belle’s mother.

THE BAD:

There is no bad for me. This film is truly magical.

THE REST:

If you loved the original Beauty and the Beast, you will definitely love this version too. And even if you’re not the biggest fan of the original, the additions may well change your mind.

I highly recommend this film and look forward to future live action versions of classic Disney animated films.

WGA Contract Negotiation Update

A few words of importance for WGA members, current and future:

CLICK HERE FOR CLICKABLE VERSION

TVWriter™ Don’t-Miss Posts of the Week – April 3, 2017

Time for TVWriter™’s  Monday look at our 5 most popular blog posts of the week ending yesterday. They are, in order:

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

Ethics in TV Storytelling from ClexaCon

8 Tips for Writing for Children’s TV Shows

BritBox is Here!

LB: 3 Shows I Just Can’t Watch Anymore

And our 5 most visited permanent resource pages are, also in order:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Logline

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT

The Teleplay

The Outline/Story

Major thanks to everyone for making this another great week at TVWriter™. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed and re-read what you loved!

Diana Vacc sees the ‘This is Us’ Season Finale

NOTE FROM LB: The week before last, TVWriter™ Contributing Writer Kate Graham wrote a very positive review of the This is Us season finale. A few days ago, without knowing about Kate’s review, our Critic-At-Large, Diana Vaccarelli sent us her perspective. They’re a bit different, but then, so are Diana and Kate. 


by Diana Vaccarelli

—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT–

Tuesday March 14, 2017 was a big day in television for me.  

It was the season finale of This is Us.  This show has become one of my all-time favorites because of both its originality and its performances, which have been of highest quality each week.

Each Tuesday of this, the show’s first season, I have been glued to my television, and this episode was no exception. I have been looking forward to the finale in the hope of seeing Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) step up to make things right with Rebecca (Mandy Moore) and the Big Three, Jack and Rebecca children, make important decisions regarding their futures.

Unfortunately…   

THE GOOD:

  • The performances of Ventimiglia and Moore couldn’t have been any stronger. The scene where the two characters fight was like a powerful blast of pure emotion.

THE BAD:

  • It truly pains me to say this because I do love this show and everything it represents: Family, love, commitment, and truth.  But this episode did not live up to the rest of the season.

    I was shocked at the writing, and not in a positive way. Dan Fogelman, the creator of this series, partnered with Isaac Aptaker and Elizabeth Berger to bring us an episode that was moved like a daytime soap opera from the 1950s, and which did absolutely nothing to further the overall story. It didn’t merely drag, it dd rr aa ggg ee dd.

    But that wasn’t the big problem. Like many fans, I was aching to know more – much more – about the death of Jack, which has been the subtext of the entire season. Yet the finale told us nothing we didn’t already know, leaving me frustrated, angry…and very disappointed at best.

THE REST:

This is Us has been a wonderful series, and I highly recommend watching the whole season. Twice. However, this finale did not come close to measuring up to previous episodes.  Come on, TIU writing staff, would it have killed you to tell us how Jack died and why his daughter Kate (Chrissy Metz) felt responsible? Are you ever going to tell us? Or don’t you want me to watch the show anymore?


Diana Vaccarelli is TVWriter™’s Critic-at-Large and one of the finest people we know. Find out more about her HERE