Writing Gigs: Writers Wanted in L.A.

Yeah, we know. Writers are always “wanted” in L.A. Except when you’re the writer and you try to sell somebody your work or your services.

Still, the L.A. Craigslist always seems to contain an awful (and they do often seem pretty damn awful) lot of showbiz writing gigs just waiting (or not) for your/our magic talents.

For those of you in L.A. trying to crash through the studio doors, here are a few potential gigs we found this week:


Coverage for TV pilots (LA) 

TV producers needs someone who can do extensive coverage for us.
Please send a couple samples, resume what TV genres/shows are you expert in?
We’ll need one page synopsis and couple pages analysis/story notes.
$25 for half hour comedy
$50 for hour long drama.
Seeking Hip Hop Comedy writer of TV Pilot (Hollywood)

Seeking Hip Hop Comedy writer of TV Pilot (Hollywood)

LA production company is seeking a fresh voice for African-American half-hour comedy pilot script gig (non-union pay)Please submit a resume, logline, and one to two-page synospis of your script.
We will contact you directly if we’re interested in reading your script.
Please be sure that your material is protected prior to sending it to us.
You can register it with the Writers Guild of America West Registry, or via the US Copyright office.

Seeking Creative Writer for Actress (West Hollywood)

We are seeking a writer who can construct everyday emails to writing creative articles.Ideally, a writer who has a major in English or equivalent
Need someone with excellent writing skills and flexible.
Looking to hire someone asap.
Please respond with two types of your favorite work that you would like us to review so we can get an idea of your writing style.
Pay
Per word or per project.

I am looking for a creative partner/scriptwriter (Hollywood Los Angeles)

I have a tv pilot that I have been working for a while now. I have a concept and story that I am very passionate about. It is unique and has something to offer that several other shows do not. I have most of the details worked out along with story arcs and plots, but I am not a scriptwriter. I am looking for someone to partner with to help write the pilot script. I would also be interested in a creative partner as well. This show has a little bit of everything: comedy, supernatural, romance, and some LGBT content in the mix. It is focused on a young adult and possibly teen audience. If you have any questions, advice or are interested in working on this with me please feel free to send me an email. Unfortunately at this time it wont be a paid position but I am willing to give credit where its due and maybe we can work out a payment option later.


EDITOR’S NOTE: Do we believe that these are all good gigs? Are we recommending them? No. Not on your life. There are way too many variables in the showbiz employment spectrum for anybody here at TVWriter™ to be able to say, based on a Craigslist ad, “Here’s a good one.”

But we do think that looking into these further could be helpful to TV writing hopefuls, if for no other reason than to get a better feeling for the Hollywood mindset. And that will be helpful to your writing future.

Who knows? You might even find yourself writing your very own self-referential script based on what happens if you apply.

Oh, and, as always, if you do respond to an ad, we would love to hear what transpired. Either in a comment or an article. Yeppers, we’ll take an article on that for sure. (Won’t pay, but, hey, that’s showbiz!)

Break a leg! (Pencil? Keyboard? iPhone?)

Commas – Gotta love ’em! Well, Gotta use ’em anyway!

We’re writers. We used commas. A lot. Except this TVWriter™ minion. I use periods because…well, because I’ve never fully understood how the damn things are supposed to be used.

But that’s no excuse. Because now we have…these lovely and comma-loving videos:

Wow, look at me dance, sing, and jump for joy cuz now I knows commas, yessirree, Bob!

Diana Vacc sees “Prison Break” Season 5 Episode 2 “Kaniel Outis”

by Diana Vaccarelli

—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT–

On April 11, 2017, Prison Break: Episode 2 Kaniel Outis aired.  In this episode Michael contacts Lincoln through a young boy who delivers a note that tells Lincoln to find the “Sheik of Light,” who will help Michael escape from Ogygia Prison. Meanwhile, Sarah develops her own investigation into Michael and has an uneasy reunion with Paul Kellerman, who now works for the State Department.

THE GOOD:

  • Writer/Creator Paul T. Scheuring brings us an episode with intense action scenes. One of my favorites is when Lincoln is searching for the Sheik and is involved in a fight to help innocent children escape an abandoned building – and the whole thing turns into a car crash! Watching this scene, I was on the edge of my seat with my fingers crossed the whole time. Another great action scene that made me feel the pain occurs when Michael schemes his way into the prison infirmary to gain pain killers and is beaten by the guards. 
  • Again we are treated to exceptional performances. Each actor brings new levels and surprise to the characters.  Dominic Purcell, who plays Lincoln Burrows, demonstrates his love and desperation while trying to convince Sheba, a local woman, to help him find the Sheik of Light. Wentworth Miller shocks us with the complexity he brings to Michael. The warm embrace between Michael and the terrorist leader when the terrorist comes out of solitary confinement shows us how much Michael has changed. And Sarah Wayne Callies, who portrays Sarah, clearly demonstrates the character’s inner conflict, especially when she meets with Paul Kellerman.       
  • I continue to admire how this show begins to answer questions and then develops more questions. It keeps you guessing and wanting more. 

THE BAD:

  • The only disapproval I have with this episode is how Michael Scofield is now friends with the Isil organization. What have you done, MICHAEL!? I feel a personal sense of betrayal but will stick it out at least until I learn…”WHY?”{ 

THE REST:

  • Being a diehard Prison Break fan I continue to be excited for each new episode.  I urge you to give this show a chance and am confident that if you do you’ll become a fellow fan with ME!!!

Diana Vaccarelli is TVWriter™’s Critic-at-Large and one of the finest people we know. Find out more about her HERE

TVWriter™ Don’t-Miss Posts of the Week – April 24, 2017

Time for TVWriter™’s  Monday look at our 5 most popular blog posts of the week ending yesterday. They are, in order:

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

Richard Kimble Was Guilty

Kelly Jo Brick: The Write Path With SCANDAL’s Raamla Mohamed – Part Two

LB: Where Did THE FALL GUY Live?

‘Trial And Error’ is Trying My Patience

And our 5 most visited permanent resource pages are, also in order:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Logline

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT

Online TV and Film Writing Workshop

The Teleplay

Major thanks to everyone for making this another great week at TVWriter™. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed and re-read what you loved!

Did You Know You Can Learn Screenwriting via YouTube?

Found on the interwebs last week:

These are just two of the helpful “hints” posted on YouTube’s “Lessons from the Screenplay” channel. There are lots more, and we surprised and delighted by what we saw there. You will be too.

The creator of this series is Michael Tucker, and if you like what you see here and on his channel, you should consider visiting his Patreon channel and helping him meet his modest goal so he can give us even more good writing tips.

Tell him TVWriter™ sent you.

Or not. What’s important is what you learn, not who referred you.

Diana Vacc sees “Prison Break” Season 5 Premier

by Diana Vaccarelli

—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT—SPOILER ALERT –

April 4, 2017 was the day Prison Break returned to our screens after a seven year “hiatus.” 

Fox television has brought back the infamous brothers Michael Scofield and Lincoln Burrows. If you weren’t a fan, or if you were but life has gotten in the way of your memory, I’ll try to catch you up, or at least remind you of where we left off. As in:

When last we saw Michael Scofield and Lincoln Burrows, they had broken out of prison and gone on the run, just in time for Michael to die from a terminal illness, the tragedy ending with a touching scene where Lincoln and Michael’s wife and son mourned at his grave.

Now, however, with the show becoming as popular as ever thanks to Netflix, the show has returned with fan faves Wentworth Miller and Dominic Purcell reprising the leads. How does a dead man return to life? In TV there are two usual ways – supernatural intervention ala a little show called, aptly enough, Supernatural and new info giving the mourners the wonderful formerly missing fact that whaddaya know, Michael is alive after all and being held in Yemeni prison.

Which means – oh, how did you guess? Now it’s up to Lincoln to break him out – again.

THE GOOD:

  • Writer/Creator Paul T. Scheuring brings us an episode full of intrigue that keeps you on the edge of your seat. I loved the scene in which Lincoln literally digs through Michael’s grave and discovers that only Michael’s jacket and pants remain. The body is gone.

    In another well written scene we find Michael in the prison and Yemen, only to hear him state that he doesn’t know Lincoln and is not Michael Scofield. As he walks away, the look on his face tells us he is lying, trying to protect his brother, although we don’t yet why and what or whom from.

    My favorite scene by far in this episode, though, is when Michael’s son asks his mother Sara what his father was like. The dialogue here is extraordinary and sensitive as Sara talks about her late husband as though he was the hero of a fairy tale.

  • The performances of all the actors are brilliant. Each one seems to genuinely become each character, giving us the souls of everybody we meet.

    Dominic Purcell brings makes the moment when Lincoln falls to the ground in tears, begging Michael to tell him what is really going on truly heartbreaking. And Wentworth Miller shocks us with his perfect – and in its way horrifying  response, demonstrating that he has become a far different – and much colder – man than the Michael we loved all those years ago.

  • By going international in scope, the writing exceeds my expectations. I love how Prison Break is now focusing on contemporary world events, especially with respect to the war against terrorism.

THE BAD:

  • The premier episode left many questions. Lots of blanks to be filled. After having been let down by so many recent series that never delivered the answers to questions raised in opening episodes, I’m concerned that viewers may never get the satisfaction we need…and that I believe all viewers deserve. I’m keeping my fingers crossed for lots of new information in the nine episodes of the show that remain.

THE REST:

  • As things stand after the opening, this revival may well be the best TV series opener in years. I thoroughly enjoyed watching it, and if the writers deliver this new version of Prison Break could well become not just must-see but iconic television viewing. I hope you try out the show and join me as a fan.

@TVWriterCom Don’t-Miss Posts of the Week – April 17, 2017

Time for TVWriter™’s  Monday look at our 5 most popular blog posts of the week ending yesterday. They are, in order:

‘Trial And Error’ is Trying My Patience

Looking for TV Pilot Scripts?

LB: 3 Shows I Just Can’t Watch Anymore

Richard Kimble Was Guilty

Larry Brody’s Poetry: ‘Kid Hollywood Had A Mighty Fine Deal’

And our 5 most visited permanent resource pages are, also in order:

Writing the Dreaded Outline

The Logline

THE PEOPLE’S PILOT

The Leavebehind

Spider-Man Unlimited

Major thanks to everyone for making this another great week at TVWriter™. Don’t forget to click above and read what you missed and re-read what you loved!